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Shining a spotlight on some of the sessions that you'll be able to join during Constellations.

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Healing Justice: A Future of Psychedelics that Prioritises Indigenous Communities and People of Colour

As psychedelics become more prominent in mainstream discourse, how can we ensure that we work towards psychedelics justice? How can we maintain Indigenous sovereignty over traditional drugs like peyote and ayahuasca and ensure that our movements to liberate psychedelics from prohibition incorporate a healing vision of justice?

Speakers

Diana Quinn, Psychedelic Liberation Collective
Alexis Martin, Drug Policy Alliance
Camille Sapara Barton, Artist, DJ, Head of Ecologies of Transformation
Ifetayo Harvey, People of Color Psychedelic Collective
Dawn D. Davis, Source Research Foundation
Rebeca Rocha Mohr, ASE Counselling Services

Fight for Your Right: Progress in the Movement Towards Just Drug Policy

The war on drugs, which is really a war on people, has seen people incarcerated for the cultivation, possession and use of drugs. The last few years has seen increased interest in decriminalising or legalising drugs. The new President of the USA even got in on the act, but unfortunately didn't follow up. Should the state control what we put in our bodies? Strategically should it be legalisation or decriminalisation? What would be the effect of reform on people who use drugs and what would it look like? These and other questions will be addressed in this session.

Speakers

Charity Monareng, TB HIV Care
Judy Chang, INPUD
Haven Wheelock, Outside In, Oregon
Sanho Tree, Institute for Policy Studies
Niamh Eastwood, Release

Poppi Drugs Museum Amsterdam: MDMA Regulation

Join Poppi Drugs Museum Amsterdam in their latest interactive exhibition – exploring the regulation of MDMA through three different models. Participate ‘live’ in an interactive, virtual environment to understand the implications of each model. In this session, you help to identify the most ideal pre-conditions to sell regulated MDMA – taking into account public acceptance and the latest insights provided by Transform UK (a guide to regulating stimulants). In this session, you contribute directly to find the best path forward to make regulated MDMA sales a reality.

Led by Poppi, with Utrecht University and Transform UK.

Speakers

Poppi Drugs Museum Amsterdam

Screening and Panel Discussion: "Ayahku, Dr G": Advocating for Cannabis Reform in Asia

Join us for a screening of Ayaku, Dr. G, followed by a discussion among medical cannabis and human rights advocates from different regions on their personal experiences in advocating for drugs – including cannabis – decriminalization, as well as sharing ideas and inspiration on how to move together collectively to destigmatize cannabis use via education.

About the Film

Ayahku, Dr. G tells the unconventional journey of a former armed forces captain; 61 year-old Amiruddin Abdullah, and his venture into the business of medical marijuana in a country where the use of cannabis is widely condemned and punishable with death.

After finding relief in the use of marijuana to treat his chronic diseases, Amiruddin Abdullah decides to help other terminally ill patients suffering from epilepsy and leukaemia by providing them CBD infused confectionaries - aptly earning himself the name ‘Dr Ganja’ (or ‘Dr. G’) on various social media platforms. Unfortunately, when stories of his medical treatments reached authorities Dr. G was arrested on 36 charges of drug-related offences. He was denied bail and is now in detention, facing a capital drug trial. 

Fighting for his innocence and release is his daughter; 33 year-old Siti Fairos, with the help of Malaysia’s opposition lawmaker Ramkarpal Singh and his legal team. Dr. G’s legal defence is a race against time, as he begins to succumb to his illness because of lack of adequate healthcare in prison.

Ayahku, Dr. G is a harrowing tale of survival and injustice, that aims to highlight the vicious cycle of abuse rooted in Malaysia’s outdated, punitive drug control policy. 

About the Campaign  #KAJIBUKANKEJI

#KajiBukanKeji (roughly translates to "study, not villianise") is a campaign that aims to destigmatize medical cannabis. The medicinal benefits of cannabis are increasingly recognised, with over 50 countries adopting medical cannabis programs. The United Nations Commission on Narcotic Drugs has also reclassified cannabis as a less dangerous drug, encouraging further research into the plant’s medicinal potential.

Malaysian law, however, does not differentiate between recreational and medical cannabis, and anyone caught with 200g or more of the drug is presumed to be trafficking — an offence punishable with death under Section 39(B) of the Dangerous Drugs Act 1952. This is a disproportionate punishment for an offence that does not constitute the “most serious crimes” under international law.

Exposure: Photography as a Tool for Public Engagement

The impact of the image in helping change the public perception cannot be underestimated, over the years images of protest and political conflict have helped raise awareness of underrepresented groups and injustices. Images are used to educate in every meaning of the word.

"That's something I've always valued about art, its quiet potential and the challenge it presents to its creator and those that view it." – Craig Harvey

In this session, photographers from around the world - all involved in documenting drug policy and harm reduction - will discuss their work and a selection of their images that they feel have an impact on the wider public.

1. Healing Justice: A Future of Psychedelics that Prioritises Indigenous Communities and People of Colour

As psychedelics become more prominent in mainstream discourse, how can we ensure that we work towards psychedelics justice? How can we maintain Indigenous sovereignty over traditional drugs like peyote and ayahuasca and ensure that our movements to liberate psychedelics from prohibition incorporate a healing vision of justice?

Speakers

Diana Quinn, Psychedelic Liberation Collective
Alexis Martin, Drug Policy Alliance
Camille Sapara Barton, Artist, DJ, Head of Ecologies of Transformation
Ifetayo Harvey, People of Color Psychedelic Collective
Dawn D. Davis, Source Research Foundation
Rebeca Rocha Mohr, ASE Counselling Services
Previous
Next

2. Fight for Your Right: Progress in the Movement Towards Just Drug Policy

The war on drugs, which is really a war on people, has seen people incarcerated for the cultivation, possession and use of drugs. The last few years has seen increased interest in decriminalising or legalising drugs. The new President of the USA even got in on the act, but unfortunately didn't follow up. Should the state control what we put in our bodies? Strategically should it be legalisation or decriminalisation? What would be the effect of reform on people who use drugs and what would it look like? These and other questions will be addressed in this session.

Speakers

Charity Monareng, TB HIV Care
Judy Chang, INPUD
Haven Wheelock, Outside In, Oregon
Sanho Tree, Institute for Policy Studies
Niamh Eastwood, Release
Previous
Next

3. Poppi Drugs Museum Amsterdam: MDMA Regulation

Join Poppi Drugs Museum Amsterdam in their latest interactive exhibition – exploring the regulation of MDMA through three different models. Participate ‘live’ in an interactive, virtual environment to understand the implications of each model. In this session, you help to identify the most ideal pre-conditions to sell regulated MDMA – taking into account public acceptance and the latest insights provided by Transform UK (a guide to regulating stimulants). In this session, you contribute directly to find the best path forward to make regulated MDMA sales a reality.

Led by Poppi, with Utrecht University and Transform UK.

Speakers

Poppi Drugs Museum Amsterdam
Previous
Next

4. Screening and Panel Discussion: "Ayahku, Dr G": Advocating for Cannabis Reform in Asia

Join us for a screening of Ayaku, Dr. G, followed by a discussion among medical cannabis and human rights advocates from different regions on their personal experiences in advocating for drugs – including cannabis – decriminalization, as well as sharing ideas and inspiration on how to move together collectively to destigmatize cannabis use via education.

About the Film

Ayahku, Dr. G tells the unconventional journey of a former armed forces captain; 61 year-old Amiruddin Abdullah, and his venture into the business of medical marijuana in a country where the use of cannabis is widely condemned and punishable with death.

After finding relief in the use of marijuana to treat his chronic diseases, Amiruddin Abdullah decides to help other terminally ill patients suffering from epilepsy and leukaemia by providing them CBD infused confectionaries - aptly earning himself the name ‘Dr Ganja’ (or ‘Dr. G’) on various social media platforms. Unfortunately, when stories of his medical treatments reached authorities Dr. G was arrested on 36 charges of drug-related offences. He was denied bail and is now in detention, facing a capital drug trial. 

Fighting for his innocence and release is his daughter; 33 year-old Siti Fairos, with the help of Malaysia’s opposition lawmaker Ramkarpal Singh and his legal team. Dr. G’s legal defence is a race against time, as he begins to succumb to his illness because of lack of adequate healthcare in prison.

Ayahku, Dr. G is a harrowing tale of survival and injustice, that aims to highlight the vicious cycle of abuse rooted in Malaysia’s outdated, punitive drug control policy. 

About the Campaign  #KAJIBUKANKEJI

#KajiBukanKeji (roughly translates to "study, not villianise") is a campaign that aims to destigmatize medical cannabis. The medicinal benefits of cannabis are increasingly recognised, with over 50 countries adopting medical cannabis programs. The United Nations Commission on Narcotic Drugs has also reclassified cannabis as a less dangerous drug, encouraging further research into the plant’s medicinal potential.

Malaysian law, however, does not differentiate between recreational and medical cannabis, and anyone caught with 200g or more of the drug is presumed to be trafficking — an offence punishable with death under Section 39(B) of the Dangerous Drugs Act 1952. This is a disproportionate punishment for an offence that does not constitute the “most serious crimes” under international law.

5. Exposure: Photography as a Tool for Public Engagement

The impact of the image in helping change the public perception cannot be underestimated, over the years images of protest and political conflict have helped raise awareness of underrepresented groups and injustices. Images are used to educate in every meaning of the word.

"That's something I've always valued about art, its quiet potential and the challenge it presents to its creator and those that view it." – Craig Harvey

In this session, photographers from around the world - all involved in documenting drug policy and harm reduction - will discuss their work and a selection of their images that they feel have an impact on the wider public.

© 2022 Harm Reduction International
Charity number – 1117375
Company number – 3223265
conference@hri.global
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